February 9, 2013
Helpful Chart For Anyone Who’d Like To Continue Living

Apparently 80-year-olds can do whatever the hell they want.”

12:48am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z2HGnvdk3p39
  
Filed under: life Healthcare 
November 1, 2012
USA.gov: Getting Ready for Your Next Doctor’s Appointment

usagov:

Most people prepare for job interviews and plan before going on a trip or taking an exam. But how many people actually get ready before going to the doctor’s office?

Preparing for a doctor’s appointment will help you make better decisions about your health, especially if your diagnosis requires…

October 15, 2012
Tom Toles

Tom Toles

September 25, 2012
Mitt Romney, On 60 Minutes, Cites Emergency Room As Health Care Option For Uninsured

Mitt Romney, On 60 Minutes, Cites Emergency Room As Health Care Option For Uninsured

August 31, 2012
cartoonpolitics:

“America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system.” ~ Walter Cronkite

cartoonpolitics:

“America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system.” ~ Walter Cronkite

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

August 25, 2012
BIG MED
Restaurant chains have managed to combine quality control, cost control, and innovation. Can health care?
BY ATUL GAWANDE




"…We’ve let health-care systems provide us with the equivalent of greasy-spoon fare at four-star prices, and the results have been ruinous. The Cheesecake Factory model represents our best prospect for change. Some will see danger in this. Many will see hope. And that’s probably the way it should be.”
[A great article on healthcare delivery - check it out]

BIG MED

Restaurant chains have managed to combine quality control, cost control, and innovation. Can health care?

BY 






"…We’ve let health-care systems provide us with the equivalent of greasy-spoon fare at four-star prices, and the results have been ruinous. The Cheesecake Factory model represents our best prospect for change. Some will see danger in this. Many will see hope. And that’s probably the way it should be.”


[A great article on healthcare delivery - check it out]

July 26, 2012
longreads:

A look behind the scenes of Texas’s decision last year to cut funding for family planning and wage “an all-out war on Planned Parenthood”—and what that may mean for the future of women’s health care:

It was a given that reasonable people could differ over abortion, but most lawmakers believed that funding birth control programs was just good policy; not only did it reduce the number of abortions, but it reduced the burden on the state to care for more children.  
That changed dramatically after 2010, when Republicans won 25 seats in the House, giving them a supermajority of 101 to 49 and total control over the law-making process. (The male-female split is 118 men to 32 women.) As the Eighty-second Legislature began, a freshman class of right-wing legislators arrived in Austin, determined to cut government spending—a.k.a. ‘waste’—and push a deeply conservative social agenda. At the same time, Governor Perry was preparing to launch his presidential bid, burnishing his résumé for a national conservative audience. It wasn’t a good time to be a Democrat, but it wasn’t a great time to be a moderate Republican either. Conservative organizations turned out to be as skilled at social media as your average sixteen-year-old, using Twitter and Facebook to chronicle and broadcast every move of the supposed RINOs. A climate of fear descended on the Capitol. ‘Most people in the House think we should allow poor women to have Pap smears and prenatal care and contraception,’ an aide to a top House Republican told me. ‘But they are worried about primary opponents.’ 
The result, in Texas and beyond, was a full-scale assault on the existing system of women’s health care, with a bull’s-eye on the back of Planned Parenthood, the major provider of both abortions and family planning in Texas and the country. As Representative Wayne Christian told the Texas Tribune, in May 2011, ‘Of course it’s a war on birth control, abortion, everything. That’s what family planning is supposed to be about.’

“Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Wives.” — Mimi Swartz, Texas Monthly
More from Swartz

longreads:

A look behind the scenes of Texas’s decision last year to cut funding for family planning and wage “an all-out war on Planned Parenthood”—and what that may mean for the future of women’s health care:

It was a given that reasonable people could differ over abortion, but most lawmakers believed that funding birth control programs was just good policy; not only did it reduce the number of abortions, but it reduced the burden on the state to care for more children.  

That changed dramatically after 2010, when Republicans won 25 seats in the House, giving them a supermajority of 101 to 49 and total control over the law-making process. (The male-female split is 118 men to 32 women.) As the Eighty-second Legislature began, a freshman class of right-wing legislators arrived in Austin, determined to cut government spending—a.k.a. ‘waste’—and push a deeply conservative social agenda. At the same time, Governor Perry was preparing to launch his presidential bid, burnishing his résumé for a national conservative audience. It wasn’t a good time to be a Democrat, but it wasn’t a great time to be a moderate Republican either. Conservative organizations turned out to be as skilled at social media as your average sixteen-year-old, using Twitter and Facebook to chronicle and broadcast every move of the supposed RINOs. A climate of fear descended on the Capitol. ‘Most people in the House think we should allow poor women to have Pap smears and prenatal care and contraception,’ an aide to a top House Republican told me. ‘But they are worried about primary opponents.’ 

The result, in Texas and beyond, was a full-scale assault on the existing system of women’s health care, with a bull’s-eye on the back of Planned Parenthood, the major provider of both abortions and family planning in Texas and the country. As Representative Wayne Christian told the Texas Tribune, in May 2011, ‘Of course it’s a war on birth control, abortion, everything. That’s what family planning is supposed to be about.’

“Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Wives.” — Mimi Swartz, Texas Monthly

More from Swartz

June 29, 2012
Tom Toles on the Romney healthcare plan

Tom Toles on the Romney healthcare plan

June 28, 2012

President Obama Speaks on Health Reform (by whitehouse)

June 28, 2012
motherjones:


The largest expansion of the American welfare state since the Great Society stands, upheld by the most conservative Supreme Court in decades. Yet the decision is not simply a landmark ruling, it is a monumental setback for a conservative movement strategy meant to sabotage, by all available means, the presidency of Barack Obama.
“The Supreme Court just saved Obama’s ass,” says Adam Winkler, a professor at the UCLA School of Law. 

Go, go, go read Adam Serwer on why the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, and where we go from here.

motherjones:

The largest expansion of the American welfare state since the Great Society stands, upheld by the most conservative Supreme Court in decades. Yet the decision is not simply a landmark ruling, it is a monumental setback for a conservative movement strategy meant to sabotage, by all available means, the presidency of Barack Obama.

“The Supreme Court just saved Obama’s ass,” says Adam Winkler, a professor at the UCLA School of Law. 

Go, go, go read Adam Serwer on why the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, and where we go from here.

(via teamanthro)

June 28, 2012
"…In particular, Roberts declared, he would make it his priority, as Marshall did, to discourage his colleagues from issuing separate opinions. “I think that every justice should be worried about the Court acting as a Court and functioning as a Court, and they should all be worried, when they’re writing separately, about the effect on the Court as an institution.”

"…In particular, Roberts declared, he would make it his priority, as Marshall did, to discourage his colleagues from issuing separate opinions. “I think that every justice should be worried about the Court acting as a Court and functioning as a Court, and they should all be worried, when they’re writing separately, about the effect on the Court as an institution.”

June 28, 2012
laphamsquarterly:

The unfortunate thing about the internet? You can’t get a picture of Obama holding up a CNN banner. (via On the Media)

laphamsquarterly:

The unfortunate thing about the internet? You can’t get a picture of Obama holding up a CNN banner. (via On the Media)

June 28, 2012
reuters:

A sharply divided Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare overhaul law that requires that most Americans get insurance by 2014 or pay a financial penalty.
“The Affordable Care Act’s requirement that certain individuals pay a financial penalty for not obtaining health insurance may reasonably be characterized as a tax,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court’s majority in the opinion.
“Because the Constitution permits such a tax, it is not our role to forbid it, or to pass upon its wisdom or fairness,” he concluded. The vote was 5-4.
READ MORE: Supreme Court upholds Affordable Care Act

reuters:

A sharply divided Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare overhaul law that requires that most Americans get insurance by 2014 or pay a financial penalty.

“The Affordable Care Act’s requirement that certain individuals pay a financial penalty for not obtaining health insurance may reasonably be characterized as a tax,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court’s majority in the opinion.

“Because the Constitution permits such a tax, it is not our role to forbid it, or to pass upon its wisdom or fairness,” he concluded. The vote was 5-4.

READ MORE: Supreme Court upholds Affordable Care Act

June 28, 2012
think-progress:

More details at ThinkProgress


[Thank you God]

think-progress:

More details at ThinkProgress

[Thank you God]

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

May 1, 2012
thenewrepublic:

Will the Supreme Court do the right thing?
“The policy consequences of overturning the Affordable Care Act, even in part, would be severe: Many millions of Americans would lose access to health insurance while many more would lose crucial consumer and financial protections. For some, it might literally be the difference between life and death.”
- The Editors, Judgment Day
Photo courtesy of Scene-Stealers

thenewrepublic:

Will the Supreme Court do the right thing?

“The policy consequences of overturning the Affordable Care Act, even in part, would be severe: Many millions of Americans would lose access to health insurance while many more would lose crucial consumer and financial protections. For some, it might literally be the difference between life and death.”

- The Editors, Judgment Day

Photo courtesy of Scene-Stealers

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