May 3, 2014

May 2, 2014
Editorial Review via Amazon

Your Inner Fish reveals a startling truth: Hidden within the human body is a story of life on Earth. This scientific adventure story takes viewers from Ethiopia to the Arctic Circle on a hunt for the many ways that our animal ancestors shaped our anatomical destiny. Come face-to-face with your “inner fish” in this completely new take on the human body: You’ll never look at yourself in quite the same way again!

ThisOldGuy: I loved this series based on Mr. Shubin’s book of the same title. Check out your local PBS station

Editorial Review via Amazon

Your Inner Fish reveals a startling truth: Hidden within the human body is a story of life on Earth. This scientific adventure story takes viewers from Ethiopia to the Arctic Circle on a hunt for the many ways that our animal ancestors shaped our anatomical destiny. Come face-to-face with your “inner fish” in this completely new take on the human body: You’ll never look at yourself in quite the same way again!
ThisOldGuy: I loved this series based on Mr. Shubin’s book of the same title. Check out your local PBS station

May 2, 2014

May 2, 2014
Video: Shell Game for Animals

May 1, 2014
Ah NYC

stagelighter:

image

Sir Ian McKellen mistaken for a beggar while taking a break outside rehearsals of Waiting for Godot.

(via nabokovsshadows)

May 1, 2014

coven-of-the-articulate:

this kind of art is so important o.o 

(Source: jedavu, via nabokovsshadows)

May 1, 2014
The banana that revealed Europe's persistent racism | Al Jazeera America

May 1, 2014

May 1, 2014
Donald Sterling Is Gone, Racism Isn't

April 30, 2014

huffingtonpost:

Because one is too many.

(Source: youtube.com, via liberalsarecool)

April 30, 2014

April 30, 2014

girliemagazine:

Squeezebox

Sorry, can’t resist setting off an earworm for this:

Mama’s got a squeeze box
She wears on her chest
And when Daddy comes home
He never gets no rest

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music’s all right
Mama’s got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

Well the kids don’t eat
And the dog can’t sleep
There’s no escape from the music
In the whole damn street

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music’s all right
Mama’s got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out

She’s playing all night
And the music’s all tight
Mama’s got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes, squeeze me, come on and squeeze me
Come on and tease me like you do
I’m so in love with you
Mama’s got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

She goes in and out and in and out and in and out and in and out

'Cause she's playing all night
And the music’s all right
Mama’s got a squeeze box
Daddy never sleeps at night

(via honey-rider)

April 30, 2014

ejacutastic:

(source)

(via topperrant)

April 30, 2014
aljazeeraamerica:

Unreasonable search of cell phones: Supreme Court to decide on privacy

When the Fourth Amendment became part of the Constitution, in 1791, protecting the people “against unreasonable searches and seizures,” there was less existential uncertainty about the meaning of “persons, houses, papers, and effects.” While the amendment has evolved to permit limited, warrantless search of arrested individuals, its application to new technology is unclear. Tuesday, the Supreme Court may begin to provide some clarity as it hears oral argument in two cases, one state and one federal, contemplating whether the Fourth Amendment permits law enforcement to search an arrestee’s cell phone.
In Riley v. California and U.S. v. Wurie, the high court faces a raft of pragmatic and philosophical questions: Is a cell phone like any other item “incident to arrest” that can be seized in the interest of protecting police officers and preserving evidence? Or is it more like the footlocker in a suspect’s car trunk that earlier case law shields from warrantless search? Is there a difference between a smart phone and an older-model flip phone for Fourth Amendment purposes? Does an arrestee have an expectation of privacy when it comes to cell phone location data, call logs or the content of conversations?

Continue reading

aljazeeraamerica:

Unreasonable search of cell phones: Supreme Court to decide on privacy

When the Fourth Amendment became part of the Constitution, in 1791, protecting the people “against unreasonable searches and seizures,” there was less existential uncertainty about the meaning of “persons, houses, papers, and effects.” While the amendment has evolved to permit limited, warrantless search of arrested individuals, its application to new technology is unclear. Tuesday, the Supreme Court may begin to provide some clarity as it hears oral argument in two cases, one state and one federal, contemplating whether the Fourth Amendment permits law enforcement to search an arrestee’s cell phone.

In Riley v. California and U.S. v. Wurie, the high court faces a raft of pragmatic and philosophical questions: Is a cell phone like any other item “incident to arrest” that can be seized in the interest of protecting police officers and preserving evidence? Or is it more like the footlocker in a suspect’s car trunk that earlier case law shields from warrantless search? Is there a difference between a smart phone and an older-model flip phone for Fourth Amendment purposes? Does an arrestee have an expectation of privacy when it comes to cell phone location data, call logs or the content of conversations?

Continue reading

April 30, 2014

(Source: sallypatti, via sheeko-wanaagsan)

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