April 18, 2014

danger0usterritory:

th3w0lfcub:

tastefullyoffensive:

Dog Fails (Part 1) [x]

Previously: Goat GIFs

danger0usterritory

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

(via burningbothends)

April 18, 2014
humansofnewyork:

"If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?""Keep your word.""What’s a time that you didn’t keep your word, that you now regret?""When I was younger, I told a friend that I’d go with her to get an abortion. And I never showed up."

humansofnewyork:

"If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?"
"Keep your word."
"What’s a time that you didn’t keep your word, that you now regret?"
"When I was younger, I told a friend that I’d go with her to get an abortion. And I never showed up."

April 18, 2014
storms-in-the-summer:

powerful

storms-in-the-summer:

powerful

(via mynotperfectsworld)

April 18, 2014
twistedlandstourguide:

jilli1205:

the-writer-with-the-magic-quill:

hollyhotdog:


Prong collars are designed to punish dogs for pulling by inflicting pain and discomfort. They can cause serious physical and emotional damage to dogs and should never be used.The metal spikes of prong collars pinch the skin around dogs’ necks when they pull and can scratch or puncture them. Over time, this can cause dogs to develop scar tissue (which has no feeling) and/or build up a tolerance to the painful pinching sensation and thus continue to pull, making walks even more difficult. Dogs may interpret the tightening of a choke or prong collar around their neck as a stranglehold (which it is, after all!) and become fearful or even aggressive.Sign the petition to get them banned, 100.000 signatures guarantees a debate in parliament.

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/58850
Guys, there’s only 5,000 signatures on this and I checked the facts and yes, these are still legal in the UK! :(


J:  I would like very much to have a bunch of these people rounded up and put where no one could find them, tie them up and weld these collars on their necks, leave food and water just barely within reach but must pull and strain to reach it.  After 6 months, release them and see if they continue to use such a collar afterwards.  If they do, round them up once more, put in a secret location and….Well it ain’t hard to figure out the next step.

Most sane individuals would have enough empathy to not use the damn things in the first place.


Apparently you can only add your name to the petition if you reside in Great Britain…

twistedlandstourguide:

jilli1205:

the-writer-with-the-magic-quill:

hollyhotdog:

Prong collars are designed to punish dogs for pulling by inflicting pain and discomfort. They can cause serious physical and emotional damage to dogs and should never be used.

The metal spikes of prong collars pinch the skin around dogs’ necks when they pull and can scratch or puncture them. Over time, this can cause dogs to develop scar tissue (which has no feeling) and/or build up a tolerance to the painful pinching sensation and thus continue to pull, making walks even more difficult. Dogs may interpret the tightening of a choke or prong collar around their neck as a stranglehold (which it is, after all!) and become fearful or even aggressive.

Sign the petition to get them banned, 100.000 signatures guarantees a debate in parliament.

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/58850

Guys, there’s only 5,000 signatures on this and I checked the facts and yes, these are still legal in the UK! :(

J:  I would like very much to have a bunch of these people rounded up and put where no one could find them, tie them up and weld these collars on their necks, leave food and water just barely within reach but must pull and strain to reach it.  After 6 months, release them and see if they continue to use such a collar afterwards.  If they do, round them up once more, put in a secret location and….Well it ain’t hard to figure out the next step.

Most sane individuals would have enough empathy to not use the damn things in the first place.

Apparently you can only add your name to the petition if you reside in Great Britain…

April 18, 2014

mypubliclands:

This week, the Trust for Public Land donated nearly 6,000 acres of stunning coastal landscape in Santa Cruz County, California, that will now be managed by the BLM for public recreation and preservation of natural resources. Known as Coast Dairies land, the donation completes a long-term effort by partners and local communities to provide a natural landscape that can be experienced and enjoyed as public lands. 

BLM lands will connect the Coast Dairies shoreline beach, recently donated to California State Parks, to the Santa Cruz Mountains east of Highway 1. The landscape includes stunning coastal terraces, rolling pastoral grasslands, oak woodlands and redwood forest. Come #DiscoverTheCoast.

Photos by Jim Pickering, BLM

April 18, 2014
Is Saturn making a new moon? | Science Wire | EarthSky

"NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet’s known moons.

"Images taken with Cassini’s narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013, show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn’s A ring — the outermost of the planet’s large, bright rings. One of these disturbances is an arc about 20 percent brighter than its surroundings, 750 miles (1,200 kilometers) long and 6 miles (10 kilometers) wide. Scientists also found unusual protuberances in the usually smooth profile at the ring’s edge. Scientists believe the arc and protuberances are caused by the gravitational effects of a nearby object. Details of the observations were published online today (April 14, 2014) by the journal Icarus.

"The object is not expected to grow any larger, and may even be falling apart. But the process of its formation and outward movement aids in our understanding of how Saturn’s icy moons, including the cloud-wrapped Titan and ocean-holding Enceladus, may have formed in more massive rings long ago. It also provides insight into how Earth and other planets in our solar system may have formed and migrated away from our star, the sun.

“‘We have not seen anything like this before,’ said Carl Murray of Queen Mary University of London, the report’s lead author. ‘We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right.’

"The object, informally named Peggy, is too small to be seen in images so far. Scientists estimate it is probably no more than about a half mile (about a kilometer) in diameter. Saturn’s icy moons range in size depending on their proximity to the planet — the farther from the planet, the larger. And many of Saturn’s moons are composed primarily of ice, as are the particles that form Saturn’s rings. Based on these facts, and other indicators, researchers recently proposed that the icy moons formed from ring particles and then moved outward, away from the planet, merging with other moons on the way.

“‘Witnessing the possible birth of a tiny moon is an exciting, unexpected event,’ said Cassini Project Scientist Linda Spilker, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. According to Spilker, Cassini’s orbit will move closer to the outer edge of the A ring in late 2016 and provide an opportunity to study Peggy in more detail and perhaps even image it.

"It is possible the process of moon formation in Saturn’s rings has ended with Peggy, as Saturn’s rings now are, in all likelihood, too depleted to make more moons. Because they may not observe this process again, Murray and his colleagues are wringing from the observations all they can learn.

“‘The theory holds that Saturn long ago had a much more massive ring system capable of giving birth to larger moons,’ Murray said. ‘As the moons formed near the edge, they depleted the rings and evolved, so the ones that formed earliest are the largest and the farthest out.’

"The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington."

April 18, 2014
Top 10 things you might not know about stars | Space | EarthSky

1. Every star you see in the night sky is bigger and brighter than our sun. Of the 5,000 or so stars brighter than magnitude 6, only a handful of very faint stars are approximately the same size and brightness of our sun and the rest are all bigger and brighter. Of the 500 or so that are brighter than 4th magnitude (which includes essentially every star visible to the unaided eye from a urban location), all are intrinsically bigger and brighter than our sun, many by a large percentage. Of the brightest 50 stars visible to the human eye from Earth, the least intrinsically bright is Alpha Centauri, which is still more than 1.5 times more luminous than our sun, and cannot be easily seen from most of the Northern Hemisphere.

2. You can’t see millions of stars on a dark night. Despite what you may hear in TV commercials, poems and songs, you cannot see a million stars … anywhere. There simply are not enough close enough and bright enough. On a really exceptional night, with no Moon and far from any source of lights, a person with very good eyesight may be able to see 2000-2500 stars at any one time. (Counting even this small number still would be difficult.). So the next time you hear someone claim to have seen a million stars in the sky, just appreciate it as artistic license or exuberant exaggeration – because it isn’t true!

3. Red hot and cool ice blue – NOT! We are accustomed to referring to things that are red as hot and those that are blue as cool. This is not entirely unreasonable, since a red, glowing fireplace poker is hot and ice, especially in glaciers and polar regions, can have a bluish cast. But we say that only because our everyday experience is limited. In fact, heated objects change color as their temperature changes, and red represents the lowest temperature at which a heated object can glow in visible light. As it gets hotter, the color changes to white and ultimately to blue. So the red stars you see in the sky are the “coolest” (least hot), and the blue stars are the hottest!

4. Stars are black bodies. A black body is an object that absorbs 100 percent of all electromagnetic radiation (that is, light, radio waves and so on) that falls on it. A common image here is that of a brick oven with the interior painted black and the only opening a small window. All light that shines through the window is absorbed by the interior of the oven and none is reflected outside the oven. It is a perfect absorber. As it turns out, this definition of being perfect absorbers suits stars very well! However, this just says that a blackbody absorbs all the radiant energy that hits it, but does not forbid it from re-emitting the energy. In the case of a star, it absorbs all radiation that falls on it, but it also radiates back into space much more than it absorbs. Thus a star is a black body that glows with great brilliance! (An even more perfect black body is a black hole, but of course, it appears truly black, and radiates no light.)

5. There are no green stars. Although there are scattered claims for stars that appear green, including Beta Librae (Zuben Eschamali), most observers do not see green in any stars except as an optical effect from their telescopes, or else an idiosyncratic quirk of personal vision and contrast. Stars emit a spectrum (“rainbow”) of colors, including green, but the human eye-brain connection mixes the colors together in a manner that rarely if ever comes out green. One color can dominate the radiation, but within the range of wavelengths and intensities found in stars, greens get mixed with other colors, and the star appears white. For stars, the general colors are, from lower to higher temperatures, red, orange, yellow, white and blue. So as far as the human eye can tell, there are no green stars.

6. Our sun is a green star. That being said, the sun is a “green” star, or more specifically, a green-blue star, whose peak wavelength lies clearly in the transition area on the spectrum between blue and green.  This is not just an idle fact, but is important because the temperature of a star is related to the color of its most predominate wavelength of emission. (Whew!) In the sun’s case, the surface temperature is about 5,800 K, or 500 nanometers, a green-blue. However, as indicated above, when the human eye factors in the other colors around it, the sun’s apparent color comes out a white or even a yellowish white.

7. Our sun is a dwarf star. We are accustomed to think of the sun as a “normal” star, and in many respects, it is. But did you know that it is a “dwarf” star? You may have heard of a “white dwarf,” but that is not a regular star at all, but the corpse of a dead star. Technically, as far as “normal” stars go (that is, astronomical objects that produce their own energy through sustained and stable hydrogen fusion), there are only “dwarfs,” “giants” and “supergiants.” The giants and supergiants represent the terminal (old age) stages of stars, but the vast majority of stars, those in the long, mature stage of evolution (Main Sequence) are all called “dwarfs.” There is quite a bit of range in size here, but they are all much smaller than the giants and supergiants. So technically, the sun is a dwarf star, sometimes called “Yellow Dwarf” in contradiction to the entry above!

8. Stars don’t twinkle. Stars appear to twinkle (“scintillate”), especially when they are near the horizon. One star, Sirius, twinkles, sparkles and flashes so much some times that people actually report it as a UFO. But in fact, the twinkling is not a property of the stars, but of Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. As the light from a star passes through the atmosphere, especially when the star appears near the horizon, it must pass through many layers of often rapidly differing density. This has the effect of deflecting the light slightly as it were a ball in a pinball machine. The light eventually gets to your eyes, but every deflection causes it to change slightly in color and intensity. The result is “twinkling.” Above the Earth’s atmosphere, stars do not twinkle.

9. You can see 20 quadrillion miles, at least. On a good night, you can see about 19,000,000,000,000,000 miles, easily. That’s 19 quadrillion miles, the approximate distance to the bright star Deneb in Cygnus. which is prominent in the evening skies of Fall and Winter. Deneb is bright enough to be seen virtually anywhere in the Northern hemisphere, and in fact from almost anywhere in the inhabited world. There is another star, Eta Carina, that is a little more than twice as far away, or about 44 quadrillion miles. But Eta Carina is faint, and not well placed for observers in most of the Northern hemisphere. Those are stars, but both the Andromeda Galaxy and the Triangulum Galaxy are also visible under certain conditions, and are roughly 15 and 18 quintillion miles away! (One quintillion is 10^18!)

10. Black holes don’t suck. Many writers frequently describe black holes as “sucking” in everything around them. And it is a common worry among the ill-informed that the so-far hypothetical “mini” black holes that may be produced by the Large Hadron Collider would suck in everything around them in an ever increasing vortex that would consume the Earth! “Say it ain’t so, Joe!” Well, I am not Shoeless Joe Jackson, but it ain’t so. In the case of the LHC, it isn’t true for a number of reasons, but black holes in general do not “suck.”

This not just a semantic distinction, but one of process and consequence as well. The word “suck” via suction, as in the way vacuum cleaners work, is not how black holes attract matter. In a vacuum cleaner, the fan produces a partial vacuum (really, just a slightly lower pressure) at the floor end of the vacuum, and regular air pressure outside, being greater, pushes the air into it, carrying along loose dirt and dust.

In the case of black holes, there is no suction involved. Instead, matter is pulled into the black hole by a very strong gravitational attraction. In one way of visualizing it, it really is a bit like falling into a hole, but not like being hoovered into it. Gravity is a fundamental force of Nature, and all matter has it. When something is pulled into a black hole, the process is more like being pulled into like a fish being reeled in by an angler, rather than being pushed along like a rafter inexorably being dragged over a waterfall.

The difference may seem trivial, but from a physical standpoint it is fundamental.

So black holes don’t suck, but they are very cool. Actually, they are cold. Very, very cold. But that’s a story for another time.

April 18, 2014
Record-setting capsule, pressure suit and parachute donated to the Smithsonian

April 17, 2014
stlcardinals:

Happy 8th Birthday, Busch Stadium! You’ve never looked better.

stlcardinals:

Happy 8th Birthday, Busch Stadium! You’ve never looked better.

April 17, 2014

(Source: wickedpixeyworld, via openbookstore)

April 17, 2014
dougieplaysbanjo:

um…..

dougieplaysbanjo:

um…..

(Source: super-yvonne-blr, via ambient-entropy)

April 17, 2014
validx2:

Cudi speaking on depression 

validx2:

Cudi speaking on depression 

(via udirtydogu)

April 17, 2014

(via ambient-entropy)

April 17, 2014

visceral-surreality:

sadghoulzclub:

"their"

the chilling, proud ignorance in her soul windows

(Source: mcguirkthejerk, via accidentaldeletion)

April 17, 2014
missbostonsays:

From the gallery of martyrs of the 20th century at Westminster Abbey: (left to right) Grand Duchess Elizabeth of Russia, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Archbishop Óscar Romero.

missbostonsays:

From the gallery of martyrs of the 20th century at Westminster Abbey: (left to right) Grand Duchess Elizabeth of Russia, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Archbishop Óscar Romero.

(via femmeviva)

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